Butterfly effect: OECD’s data visualisation fail leads to media panic

Summary: Intro | A case of tl;dr | Where was the graph police? | A quick fix

This is a short story about a graph that could have been done better and an article that has gone awry. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), one of the most powerful research bodies there is, has published an excellent report on the influence of robotics on the job market: conclusion of which was misinterpreted in a Polish influential newspaper, Krytyka Polityczna, and in other media. In this post I will analyze both the article and the report, to then theorize on what has gone wrong and who (or what) is to blame.

Getting Philosophical About a Line Chart. Data Visualisation from Scratch P.3

Today’s “from scratch” example with D3 is a must-have element of any data visualisation portfolio: a line chart. Line charts are great of visualizing changes in data over time. Just as in the previous posts in the series, my visualisation is a variation of a piece of code I found on the web. I started with a basic template created by Mike Bostock and then re-worked some of its elements to boost its usability & readability. As with the previous examples, all code can be downloaded, reused, adjusted, and it scales up and down to include extra data series or to remove one.

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Stories from a Bar (Chart). Data Visualisation from Scratch P.2

Summary: Intro | A Simple Bar Chart | A Multi-Series Bar Chart

If this post was a painting, it would probably be one of Mark Ryden’s works: it seems I have just gone and done a one detailed blog post. The funny thing is that it’s about bar charts, and everything has already been said about bar charts. In fact a bar chart is a graph so simple, this post should never have been written: yet, the simpleness of a bar chart is actually it’s most dangerous trap. It’s very easy to overdo, and with so few elements it’s tempting to tweak or enhance at least some of them. So this blog post is, above all, about resistance. I will look at what – and why – constitutes as a good bar chart, what are the best practices, and how to fight the horror vacui of a simple plot. We will use D3.js and the blank canvas we have built with zero coding skills in the last post to create a reusable template of a simple bar graph, and then of a multi-series bar graph. This is part of a data visualisation with D3 series, throughout which we will create a set of graphics that can be easily re-purposed for data visualisation projects.

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