Geek Christmas: 10 best books to entertain a Data Scientist

Joost Swarte for New Yorker, August 2015 (detail)

Oh, the every year’s Christmas epiphany: shopping for people we’d like to think we know is hard. To help those looking for a perfect gift for their befriended Data Scientist, or those wanting to indulge themselves with a good read, here is a roundup of books that would let no data geek down. The selection is subjective: I deliberately missed out the classics, and focused on less-obvious choices that are guaranteed to entertain and enlighten.

Continue reading “Geek Christmas: 10 best books to entertain a Data Scientist”

Colourful nonsense: what does your data visualisation actually say?

The democratisation of data visualisation tools brought us two major advancements: we can make great analytical products, faster. We can deceive easier, too.

Previously a domain ruled by statisticians and IT departments, analytics have now opened up to anyone with a laptop. For marketers and managers alone, BI apps such as Tableau, QlikView, or MS Excel have become a commodity. Tools have matured too: programming fluency was overruled by drag-and-drop interfaces. A visually stunning chart is literally a click away. The software intelligently picks the graph type and the colour scheme for us. For the more ambitious users the adjustment options are plenty, although within the range of pre-programmed configurations. While some of these visual endeavours lead to great analytical products, some result in colourful nonsense.

Continue reading “Colourful nonsense: what does your data visualisation actually say?”

Harmful statistics: John Oliver on forensic science

John Oliver goes John Oliver on forensic science and it’s a must watch. Forensic science brought statistics to courts, but itself it’s only rarely exposed to scientific scrutiny. Justice system’s failure to question forensics methodology and common fear of scientific jargon has led to convicting innocent people for crimes they haven’t commited. Courts have given life sentences solely based on bite marks, partial fingerprints, and hair collected at crime scene despite of no proof these methods are infallible.

Watch John Oliver’s Last Week Tonight episode below and make sure to read the excellent investigative article by Jordan Smith on the Intercept that the show was based on.

Eve

It’s gonna be #phun

I will be at Oracle Code conference on the 6th of June in Brussels, redefining fun with Python on Oracle database. The idea is to live demo working with tables, handling JSON files, (new) spatial data queries, data visualisation, and a couple of good practices of database application development with Python.

There will be snakes, ridiculous maps, and misbehaving queries. Come if you’re in town, it’s gonna be #phun

Eve