A recipe proved to solve every* VM’s proxy problems

Summary: Intro | Obtaining the proxy server address | Configuring proxy settings – checklist | Other tools

*Fedora / RHEL / CentOS

At first I wanted to title this post as Welcome to Proxy Hell, because – at least at first – getting the proxy settings right on a VM can feel like a nightmare. Especially, if you have no idea about were to start or, more depressingly, when none of your attempts to fix the problem seem to be successful. Nearly inevitably, if working in an office, you have come across proxies. It has become a standard for companies to guard their network traffic with a proxy server. The idea is that the server acts as an intermediary between the private company network and the internet, which both hides the web traffic from the outside eyes and can serve as a base for implementing access authentication and bandwidth control.

Perhaps the first time you consciously acknowledge the presence of a proxy is when your browser’s homepage instead of directing you to Google.co.uk goes to Google.in or Google.pl, and the Search button shows up in a different language than expected. That’s your proxy server location that’s just fooled Google. The second time you come across proxies is less amusing: this is when you start working with, or worse, configuring Virtual Environments and realise that even the basic tasks, like accessing a webpage or installing a package don’t work. For instance, if you followed the Hadoop clustering guide from my last post in an office environment you wouldn’t have been able to get most of it working it without setting up a proxy. Yet, the guide conveniently skips that topic with a vague warning: make sure you’re not behind a proxy. So, what to do if you were? Continue reading “A recipe proved to solve every* VM’s proxy problems”